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I am trying to determine the resources needed for our MSMQ servers and am getting confused reading the documentation. For example, can MSMQ 3.0 store 25GB of messages (average message size 15K) and, if so, what are the server specifications required to support it?

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2 Answers 2

IdahoX, you would need at least 25GB of memory beyond what the server OS requires - you would need a 64-bit operating system, and at least 25GB of hard disk storage-space as well for the memory-mapped files. This is per http://blogs.msdn.com/b/johnbreakwell/archive/2008/02/29/what-are-msmq-s-limits-if-i-had-a-farthing-for-every-time.aspx. As Breakwell points out, however, 25GB of 15K messages is about 1.6 million messages - is your assumption that the application which drains that queue will be unable to keep up with an extraordinarily high volume of messages? You may need to revisit whether the application is designed properly for the load of messages it will be processing.

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Thanks for the response! I wrote this question about a year ago and we are now in the process of rebuilding the app. The queue was a 'trickle feed' of point-of-sale data from retail locations to HQ. It was actually more like a data flood. Everything was fine as long as all downstream systems were up. If there was any delay (e.g. database outage etc.),the system would collapse in hours. For overall reliability and simplicity we are going to a file-based system and making sure we have lots of disc to store the messages. –  IdahoX Mar 12 '11 at 5:14

In my experience the CPU load required to simply host an MSMQ is basically nothing. The memory on the other hand, is pretty high. You should expect to have a LOT of memory so that the queue can be loaded into memory.

It is typically recommended that you not have more than a couple of Gigs in queue at any one time as things will start getting "funky".

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