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I have an Ubuntu 9.04 box and a OS X 10.5 box. They are both on the same subnet (192.168.10.0/24). I can see ubuntu.local and osx.local from the OS X machine, but I can only see ubuntu.local from the Ubuntu machine. When I ping them ubuntu.local is 192.168.10.50, but osx.local is 192.168.132.1. The OS X machine's IP is obviously wrong and I am not certain how it got it. I connect to three networks with it (192.168.20.0/24 ethernet, 192.168.2.0/24 wireless, and the aforementioned 192.168.10.0/24 wireless), so 192.168.132.1 seems very odd.

I would tag this this mdns, but I don't have enough points yet.

Here are the results ifconfig, it does appear as if bonjour is grabbing the VMWare network instead of the the wired or wireless. How can I tell it to use the wireless (or wired)?

lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 16384
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1 
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000 
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128 
gif0: flags=8010<POINTOPOINT,MULTICAST> mtu 1280
stf0: flags=0<> mtu 1280
en0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    ether 00:17:f2:d6:39:8a 
    media: autoselect status: inactive
    supported media: autoselect 10baseT/UTP <half-duplex> 10baseT/UTP <full-duplex> 10baseT/UTP <full-duplex,hw-loopback> 10baseT/UTP <full-duplex,flow-control> 100baseTX <half-duplex> 100baseTX <full-duplex> 100baseTX <full-duplex,hw-loopback> 100baseTX <full-duplex,flow-control> 1000baseT <full-duplex> 1000baseT <full-duplex,hw-loopback> 1000baseT <full-duplex,flow-control> none
fw0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 2030
    lladdr 00:19:e3:ff:fe:77:30:9c 
    media: autoselect <full-duplex> status: inactive
    supported media: autoselect <full-duplex>
en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    inet 192.168.10.102 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.10.255
    ether 00:19:e3:d8:b3:5e 
    media: autoselect status: active
    supported media: autoselect
vmnet8: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    inet 192.168.132.1 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.132.255
    ether 00:50:56:c0:00:08 
vmnet1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    inet 192.168.238.1 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.238.255
    ether 00:50:56:c0:00:01
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1 Answer 1

Does your system have Vmware, Parallels or something like that? I believe that they setup a virtual network adapter and assign additional private addresses. A quick google search returned this page which suggests a fix may work.

If you run 'ifconfig' in a Terminal on your OSX box do you see a 192.168.132.? address?

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1  
after running "/Library/Application\ Support/VMware\ Fusion/boot.sh restart" the ip address associated with osx.local is now the expected one, even after a reboot. –  Chas. Owens May 21 '09 at 2:47
    
Spoke too soon, after a few minutes it switched back to the VMWare ip address. –  Chas. Owens May 21 '09 at 2:50
    
Did you comment out the nat/host vmnet-netifup commands like the link suggested? If you used only bridged networking you don't need them. –  Zoredache May 21 '09 at 6:43
    
No, I need them. I use host-only, nat, and bridged VMs. The real solution will be to find out how to tell bonjour to use a given network for mdns. –  Chas. Owens May 21 '09 at 20:37
    
Unfortunately you reached the limit of what I know. I don't even have a Mac, I was just telling you want I knew from running Vmware on Linux. I got the impression from the some of the pages on Google that this issue didn't exist in earlier versions of OSX, perhaps it is something Apple will fix. –  Zoredache May 21 '09 at 21:54

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