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I'm wanting to host a few websites from home, primarily because I'm using some BETA Microsoft software (.NET 4 and EF) and don't want to install it on my production server which is hosted at eukhost.com.

Basically, I'm completely new to this sort of thing. So far, here is what I've done:

  1. Registered the domain name at namecheap.com (let's call it mydomain.com)
  2. Gone to "Nameserver Registration" in the panel and entered my IP address for the NS1 and NS2 records (let's say the IP is 0.0.0.0).
  3. Gone to "Domain Name Server Setup" and entered ns1.mydomain.com & ns2.mydomain.com
  4. Forwarded requests from port 80 to my internal IP (let's say 192.168.1.254)
  5. Created the website in IIS (I'm just testing with a single website so far, so have not created any host header values)

Now, if I type in the IP address (http://0.0.0.0) I get the site as expected. However, if I enter http://www.mydomain.com I get an error saying "DNS Error - Cannot find server".

I'm aware that there is a service from DynDNS that will automatically change the IP if I have a dynamic address, however my IP has remained static since I installed the ISP (since October) so I don't need this.

Is there any way that I can get the DNS to work just by configuring IIS or something in Windows? I don't really want to have to pay for any 3rd party service.

Thanks,

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Some domain registrars offer DynDNS feature free. Namecheap being one of them. I believe EuroDNS can also do that. –  user21708 Jan 28 '10 at 10:11
    
When did you set up the dns settings? It could take a day to start working. –  blank Jan 28 '10 at 10:12
    
@Developer Art - Does it just come with the account? I can't seem to find it anywhere. @Bedwyr Humphreys - I changed the DNS records yesterday. Have I done the correct things in Namecheap? –  Paul Jan 28 '10 at 10:19
    
With NC yes you can activate it somewhere in the account. They should have some tool to install on your PC to communicate your IP changes back to NC. –  user21708 Jan 28 '10 at 10:21
    
So do I transfer the domain back to Namecheap first I take it? –  Paul Jan 28 '10 at 10:22
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Feb 1 '10 at 8:52

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3 Answers

I'll make it an answer since I'd like to quote something.

A link directly from their main page: Dynamic DNS

  • We provide Dynamic DNS option free with every domain. Dynamic DNS can be used to point your domain to a computer that changes IP address after sometime, like your computer connected to the internet.
  • We also provide a windows client software to use this feature.
  • We don't restrict you to our software. You are free to any client that supports our service or create your own.
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Thanks, it's working fine now –  Paul Jan 28 '10 at 10:35
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I think the mistake you've made is around the following steps:

  • Gone to "Nameserver Registration" in the panel and entered my IP address for the NS1 and NS2 records (let's say the IP is 0.0.0.0).
  • Gone to "Domain Name Server Setup" and entered ns1.mydomain.com & ns2.mydomain.com

What it looks like you've done is "told the internet" that the nameservers for your domain name are to be found at IP address "0.0.0.0", i.e. that you have a DNS server actively running at that IP address that is authoritative for the name "mydomain.com". What you should do is point the NS1 and NS2 records back to namecheap.com's name servers and use their control panel to point the "A" record to 0.0.0.0.

Also - you may get more luck with this question on serverfault.com as it's more of a server configuration thing than a coding thing :)

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Thanks Rob, yep I transferred the domain back to namecheap and updated the A record to be my IP and its now working. –  Paul Jan 28 '10 at 10:36
    
How about an upvote then, if the accepted answer is alrady taken? ;-) And yup, the first time I tried to point a domain-name to my own machine, I did exactly the same thing! It seems obvious now, but at the time it felt like I was banging my head aginst a wall trying to work it all out. Nameservers, A records, CNAME's, aargh! :) –  Rob Jan 28 '10 at 10:39
    
Done :-) I agree, it's never interested me to learn these things, so I try and remain ignorant but it always comes back to haunt! –  Paul Jan 28 '10 at 10:48
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and as a sidenote: pls check your isp's agrrements. A lot of them don't allow public accessable webservices, that are hosted at the user's home.

Andreas

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True, but if you're not hammering the bandwidth i wouldn't worry too much. I've done this for years with different providers, sometimes running a mail server and never had a problem. –  blank Jan 28 '10 at 10:50
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