Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking at two different options to host the databases of my websites.

1) I can use the Shared SQL Server 2008 offerings of my host company (plenty of space) instead of installing database software on my webserver.

2) I can install my copy of SQL Server 2008 Web Edition on my Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V VPS account and host my database directly.

I realize there are questions about the load on the shared server, what I'll have the website doing, etc, but essentially this is just a server hosting a few CMS sites that have moderate traffic in the whole scheme of things.

So, my real question is: Are there any glaring issues between one choice or the other in terms of speed and performance that is commonly known?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With solution 1:

  • you don't put extra overhead of managing another SQL instance
  • You will have good performance as it seems underused
  • Your applications will have to stick with the current SQL collation (is it ok ?)
  • For security reasons, this web sites should have restricted access, just to their database. NO SA/ADMIN ACCOUNT
  • If you have a firewall in the middle which is stateful, just check your web sites can survive a lost SQL connection

With Solution 2:

  • If the web sites are hacked, the hacker will only get access to small sql database, and not to your main sql server
  • If you need later to move the web sites to another location, easier to move them with their own sql server
  • You will have to manage/backup/monitor/patch another SQL instance just for that small sites

I vote for Solution 1 except if your others database are high sensitive confidential content. I always prefer one SQL instance well managed than 2 badly managed

share|improve this answer
    
Add to that: crappy performance because your VPS likely does NOT Have the same fast disc subsystem than a dedicated SQL Sever machine. This can make a HUGH difference. –  TomTom Mar 17 '11 at 6:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.