Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a local Windows Server 2003 DNS server that handles all incoming requests. We used to host our website locally on IIS, which our local DNS server would point to for incoming requests.

We recently ditched our IIS server for a hosted VPS running Linux. However, I'm not too happy with this VPS and would like to get the server back on-site, but I want to keep Linux, as opposed to going back to a Windows box.

My question is, will I experience any problems by having a local Windows Server directing traffic to a Linux box? I haven't intermingled the two before. I know Samba exists, but my understanding this is primarily for Windows clients on a Linux network, not the other way around.. (I could be completely wrong on that!)

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are just planning to run DNS on the Windows server, but not using it to actually handle any load-balancing or traffic direction. In that case, as long as your DNS correctly resolves to the Linux server, I see no problem. Samba should not be needed as it does not seem there will be any direct communication needed between your Windows server and the Linux server.

share|improve this answer

My question is, will I experience any problems by having a local Windows Server directing traffic to a Linux box?

If you mean that the Windows Server will have RRAS installed on it and will forward traffic inbound on port 80 and 443 to the Apache server than no, there will not be a problem.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm..That is "Routing and Remote Access" right? - What is the "S" stand for? –  cinqoTimo Feb 10 '10 at 22:19
    
Routing and Remote Access Server. Microsoft refers to the services as RRAS: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc669284(PROT.10).aspx –  ta.speot.is Feb 11 '10 at 1:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.