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What is the most popular resolution in use in your company? Our is 1440 x 900 (15" widescreen).

Is anyone using 1024x768 or less anymore? I'm sure there odd machines here and there but I'd have thought >1024x768 is not popular, am I right?

Finally what's the lowest resolution you have in general use?

Thanks

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I do not miss the days when we had to design for 800x600, and still make it acceptable in 640x480. Bring on 2160p! –  Mark Henderson Feb 22 '10 at 22:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

1024*768 is a lot less common than it once was but it is still common enough to be considered for things such as web design (i.e. "it should look right on 1024*768 or higher, and degrade gracefully on lower"). It is the most common resolution on non wide-screen laptops for instance. Most new non-widescreen monitors are 17" or 19" and have a native resolution of 1280*1024 (5:4 aspect ratio), but larger models often have larger resolutions (those these aren't overly common). Widescreen resolutions are a lot more varied though. In my limited experience 1680*1050 (16:10) is most common in new monitors at the moment, closely followed by 1920*1080 (16:9) for screens over 22". For small screens (and some larger screens that are primarily intented to be TVs) you will find that 1280*720 is not uncommon. The many mobile and otherwise small-form-factor devices available muddy the waters much further though.

The lowest in general use where I work is 1024*768 (a couple of laptops, the newest being ~18 months old). The lowest on the desktop is 1280*1024. On my desk at home I have 1920*1050 and 1050*1680 (a widescreen monitor rotated 90 degrees is a wonderfuly useful thing sometimes). The smallest though is my netbook at 1024*600 (or sometimes 600*1024), which is used at times for both work and play.

If you are asking because you are planning some sort of design that might be screen resolution/size sensitive, I would recommend that you aim quite small as your lowest common denominator and try make sure your design looks good (or at least good enough) on a range of screen sizes. Long gone are the days when there was only two or three screen resolutions to worry about in the general populous - there are many screen sizes that are common enough to be considered popular.

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Thanks for a great answer! –  Scott Johansen Feb 22 '10 at 21:43

Our "most popular" is the native resolution of the LCD screen itself. As we have many different models of screens, the resolution varies greatly.

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Same here - Pretty much everyone runs their displays at native resolution. All of our software is designed to operate at a minimum resolution of 1024x768 for legacy compatibility though. –  voretaq7 Feb 22 '10 at 21:17
    
Thanks, we too run at native res but as there are various 15" and 17" monitors (wide/non wide etc) I was interested in the res. Thanks all the same. –  Scott Johansen Feb 22 '10 at 21:20
    
@Scott: If you wanted to know "what should I design a webpage for" then should should have asked that question. Don't beat around the bush and you might actually get the sort of answer you're looking for. –  Chris S Feb 27 '10 at 16:14

From what I've seen, both where I work and places I visit, resolution varies for a number of reasons.

  • Some applications don't scale to suit the window size, so people who use such applications tend to have lower resolutions
  • Programmers, artists and CAD users generally prefer quite high resolutions
  • Older people generally use lower resolutions than younger folk, as eyesight degrades with age
  • Those doing secretarial type work mostly use lower resolutions and they, more than any other group, will rotate their screen through 90 degrees to better display documents

Personally, for a 19 inch monitor I like it around 1280 x whatever suits the screen proportions but sit fairly close to it because of the aging eyes issue.

The web site stats that I have access to indicate that 1280x1024 is the most common, with 1024x768 still being used quite a lot. Of course this will depend greatly on the type of person the web site tends to be used by. There is however a very definite trend towards higher resolutions.

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In my small company there are only LCD's with native resolution 1650x1080 (including laptops). We also use netbooks with 1024x600.

When upgrading to new laptops we will buy FullHD 1920x1080.

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Man what kind of budget do you have for laptops when you can buy full HD monitors? –  Mark Henderson Feb 22 '10 at 22:55
    
We consider needs and the laptops are our tools. Programmers do like big resolutions :) –  twk Feb 23 '10 at 23:29

The most popular resolution in our office is the one that the user sets for themselves. ;)

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Like "do more exercise" and "lose weight"? –  Joseph Feb 22 '10 at 22:48
    
LOL. That made me chuckle. ;) –  joeqwerty Feb 22 '10 at 23:04

1280 x 1024 for the locked down users on 19inch standard monitors

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I had a tablet laptop I inherited last year that had a 1024x768 display, but most desktop monitors have 1280x1024 as a minimum. This was not due to choice, but rather due to the corporate IT purchasing decision. In some cases developers or other heavy users would have a two of these 1280x1024 displays.

Like anyone who works with a number of machines, though, I often use Remote Desktop or am hosting a VM, and those screens can be often be 1024x768 or less.

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1280x1024 is probably by far the most popular. We do however have a number of users who are visually impaired and need to run at much lower resolutions (in addition to using magnification or screen reading software). If you're going to use the responses to this for guaging design of a website or application, you really need to take that into account.

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