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We are running web site, say ourdomain.com, over our own server(Win 2003 Server R2 Standard Edition). We would like to run our own mailserver so that our users have user@ourdomain.com mail address. our domain was registered with company A. we got our static ip + dsl link from isp company B. We are running our site on our own Win 2003 Server R2 Standard Edition servers. also we are interested (at least for the moment) in using win 2003 built in email services.

I would like to know what changes do we need to make like mx records etc and how?

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As has been mentioned, the built in mail services in Windows are not really sufficient to run a a mail server for multiple users. If you are happy to outsource your mail then there are many options available. If you want to keep it in house, then there are a number of apps that may be suitable for you needs:

Products like MSExchange, whilst providing a host of great features, are probabley overkill for a small company and require alot of knowledge and expertise to setup and administer.

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The MX record points to the A record of your mail server, or the mail server of the email provider you choose. If the server is in your domain then create an A record with the IP of your mail record. If the mail server is another service providers then you do not need to create any other DNS records.

The built in Win2003 services are very minimal and generally not sufficient and not recommended. MS Exchange, not built in except with SBS and otherwise a separate product, is a very full featured email server that also requires significant administrative skills, backup procedures and possibly hardware depending on the # of users and level of uptime your organization requires. Finally, running your email server on your web server is generally not recommended for security and performance reasons.

IMO, at this point in time the large hosted email providers: Google Apps/Gmail, Rackspace, Microsoft BPOS, AppRiver, Intermedia, etc, etc all offer better email services than a small org (somewhere between 75 - 250 users) can afford to provide on their own. Better = cheaper, more reliable, more storage; it doesn't mean perfect. Don't fight the tide, outsource.

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