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Let's just say that you want to prove that unauthorized access has happened to a GMail account. You know from where that would've occurred. Google's "Last Account Activity" shows currently active sessions but what if the suspected access happened a month or more ago? Does Google keep records about how the account has been used? If so, hwo would you go about getting them?

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You would contact google and explain the problem to them and ask them for help. That's it.

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Problem is, Google have deliberately made themselves hard to contact (with some justification). You go through their Help Center and it's all about this automated form for recovering your password, etc. I haven't found anything where I can just fill out a message to contact them. –  cletus May 25 '09 at 1:57
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Ahem, its free ... one of the ways Google provide GMail for free is to keep the cost of support as low as possible. Unfortunately that means they can't afford to take support calls from their customers –  Dave Cheney May 25 '09 at 2:08
    
My suggestion is that you simply change your password and be attentive to guarding your password and accessing your account on shared computers. Also use https. I doubt google will open their records to you for this. –  pc1oad1etter May 25 '09 at 15:10
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You need to know someone there or have a subpoena.

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Through a lawyer.

Google will need to find the data, verify your identity, ensure that they're complying with any legal requirements, ensure they're only providing data for your account and not any other accounts that might have used the same IP addresses, etc. It'll probably pass through at least two or three people at a cost of hundreds of dollars in labor. Google aren't going to provide this information unless they have a legal requirement to do so.

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