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We got 2 server, Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Server(DNS, DHCP) and one server as a Application Server.

we restricted user access to their hard disk and partitions, and redirected their My document to that Application Server and make for each client private folder. we got around 160 user and they use only Microsoft Word and save doc file on their my document.

So I want to replace that Application Server with one NAS Storage for getting best performance! Questions are: Is it good Solution for getting best network performance? Is it difficult to configure NAS storage for using in Windows server 2003 Platform, Make that special folder for each user? because most NAS Storage use Linux OS and File system? Which Microsoft services don't support NAS Storage? (I heard about Exchange, anything else?!) Is there any NAS with windows OS? any suggestion for NAS to buy?

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3 Answers 3

a NAS is a file server- as long as you use the same protocols you use with your current one there shouldn't be any difference. The advantage of a NAS is simply that you don't have the overhead of a full OS.

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sorry! I correct my question, we use one server as a application server and network shared folders –  user19049 Mar 9 '10 at 18:36
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So how much money do you have to spend?

You might want to check this linux distro out, you could build a computer to your specs, and then build the file server with SME

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we want spend 1000$, build a computer for that purpose is time wasting, we want fast and easy to install solution –  user19049 Mar 9 '10 at 20:12
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As noted above, it's a question of cost. We have replaced all of our file servers with Netwok Appliance (NetApp) NASs, and they make relatively low-end systems, but if you're just replacing one server it would be overkill. If you plan on growing, however, that might be an option for you.

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