Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have my network set up like this. http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AZ1YxuLE4djaZGhqN2s1NmRfMjhjNjc0Ym1meg&hl=en

In words: I have a machine (Calcium, running Arch Linux) that has two network interfaces. eth0 is hoooked up to a router, and is gigabit. Eth1 is hooked up directly to the university network over 10Megabit. The router's uplink is hooked up to the university network as well, and it is also 10Megabit.

Currently (I believe) all traffic on Calcium is going through eth0, through the router, regardless of whether it is internal or external. (How can I confirm this?)

Ideally, traffic that is destined for the internal network (192.168.10.0/24) would travel over eth0 to the router, and wherever it is going. ALL other traffic should go over eth1.

share|improve this question
    
Added tags: tcpip routing route –  Warner Mar 17 '10 at 20:10
    
Your Google document doesn't help much here if you don't grant people permissions to access it. –  Zoredache Mar 17 '10 at 21:32
    
Sorry. I thought I made it public, but Google docs didn't seem to remember my setting. It should be accessable now. –  Mike Cooper Mar 17 '10 at 21:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your network routing table will determine how the packets are routed. You can add additional routes or change the default gateway to affect the routing.

If you would like additional assistance, please provide your routing table.

To display the routing table:

/sbin/route -n

To delete default gw:

/sbin/route del default gw $IP

To add default gw:

/sbin/route add default gw $IP

For additional details, check out the manpage. There are other ways to manipulate and display the routing table as well.

netstat -r to display and ip to manipulate further.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.