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If the answer is possible,how?

DNS is not for this kind of job,obviously.

UPDATE

Can someone answer this question:

domain name : IP -> DNS;

IP : Mac -> ??

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I think you better clarify your update, as that is not a question and therefore cannot be answered. –  John Gardeniers May 8 '10 at 5:11

3 Answers 3

Yes, of course it is. You can add an alias for your NIC that gets a different IP adress or add a second NIC with a different IP.

How this is done varies with the OS used, which you didn't state.

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Do you mean I need to have multiple NIC to host multiple IP address? –  apache May 7 '10 at 10:39
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@apache: No. You can have multiple IP addresses on a single NIC. –  Benoit May 7 '10 at 10:41
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I'm using windows XP, using ADSL. I doubt how I can add/change the IP without authentication. –  apache May 7 '10 at 10:46
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OK, if you try to get a second public IP address for your DSL line, you are probably out of luck as I never heard of any provider who would offer that. Please extend your original question with some info on what you want to do and why. –  Sven May 7 '10 at 11:07
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Sorry, I don't understand this question. Domain name and DNS are the same for me, and I don't see how the MAC address matters here. Please try to explain what you want to do. –  Sven May 7 '10 at 12:31

On Windows, go to the properties of your network connection, then in the TCP/IP properties, then click "Advanced". You can add additional IP addresses there.

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You can buy an IP Pool from your ISp and ask them to bind the IP pool to your master IP. They will update on their DNS so any query for any of the IP addresses in the pool will come to you. Nice way of separating services.

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