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So I have 1 computer with 5 IP's and around 15 sites being hosted.

I have 4 of the ips setup to be dedicated for 4 sites and the rest share the 5th ip.

When I'm setting up my name server, do I set it up at Godaddy my Registar or on my server's dns or both?

Can I just setup

NS1 - Add all the ips NS2 - Add all the ips

And just have all the sites use those two name servers?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you have one computer I would recommend against running your own DNS server. Use a 3rd-party provider (GoDaddy's DNS is fine in your case, as would that of ZoneEdit.com, DtDNS, etc.).

If you're set on running DNS on your own system you can register your name server through your registrar. Choose one IP for NS1, and another IP for NS2. Also, create the A records for ns1/2 in the zone file for the domain they're on. Set up your DNS server software to listen and answer queries on those two IP addresses. Once you've tested that it's answering queries, change the name server delegations to use the names you registered with the registrar. This should complete the process.

The RFCs recommend two name servers on logically and geographically diverse networks for redundancy and availability. Having two IP addresses on the same computer assigned to your name server defeats both of these design goals.

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thank you very much –  Tyler Aug 18 '10 at 8:10

"If you have one computer I would recommend against running your own DNS server. Use a 3rd-party provider (GoDaddy's DNS is fine in your case, as would that of ZoneEdit.com, DtDNS, etc.)."

But if you want to run your own email server, and not have to masquerade to your domain for email, etc.. then you would need to have your own DNS server to have your own named servers, etc for MX records correct?

I was also with GoDaddy, but I was told to be able to run my own email server, I would need to have my own DNS server.

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Your e-mail and DNS can be on entirely different systems and often use different domain names. For example, if I own example.com and have mail.foo.com as my mail provider, I would just add an MX record to the example.com zone and point it to the provider as @ IN MX 10 mail.foo.com. The mail server will then need a reverse DNS entry which corresponds to its IP address, and preferably one that has a host which also resolves back to the IP. That reverse name doesn't have to have anything to do with the domains actually hosted on that mail server and the DNS host can also be different. –  Justin Scott Apr 17 '11 at 3:59

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