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Following ruslany's suggestion on the URL Rewrite Tips page here, I'm trying to use URL Rewrite to redirect http:// requests for my site to https://. I've written and tested the rule using a test site I set up, and so now the final piece is to create a second site (http) to redirect to my https site. (I need to use a second site because I don't want to uncheck the "Require SSL encryption" checkbox on my existing site.)

I'm an IIS newbie so my question is: how do I do this? Should I create a site with the same name and host header, only it will be bound to http? Will IIS let me create a site with the same name? I don't want to screw anything up with my existing site (which is a SharePoint site, currently used by external users). That site currently has http and https bound to it. So my assumption is that, using ISS (not SharePoint), I will create a new site (http only) with the same name and host header as my existing site, and add the URL Rewrite rule to the http site. And then I guess I should remove the http binding from my existing site? Does that seem correct?

Any advice, gotchas, etc., would be appreciated. Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

You're on the right track. Usually in these cases I will create an HTTP version with the bindings on port 80 and the appropriate IP/hostname combinations, then set the host to use HTTP redirection to the secure URL with a 301 status code. Then, there would be a second entry in IIS which would hold the bindings for the SSL version. The names on the list in IIS don't matter much, but I would make them unique so they are easy to differentiate. Also remember to give each site its own "home" folder where the web.config file will be stored. If they share a home folder the settings will not come out right (in IIS 7 anyway, IIS 6 does not have this issue).

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