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I'm tuning a production server that runs Windows Server 2003 SP2. I want to monitor the hard faults (read an write separately) for each process. Is it possible?

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possible duplicate of Monitoring Hard Faults on Windows Server 2003 using PerfMon –  Massimo Jun 18 '10 at 13:06
    
The thread you indicated show how to monitor the overall hard faults. My question is about to monitor hard faults for each process. –  Renan Vinícius Mozone Jun 18 '10 at 16:33
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3 Answers 3

Your best bet would be to use process explorer from Sysinternals found here. You can glean a lot of information for any running process.

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I use Sysinternals Process Explorer for a while and I couldn't find any information about hard faults for each process (neither about read and write hard faults separately for each process). It only shows the total page faults and the page fault delta. As far as I know, a page fault can be a soft or hard. I'm interested in the hard faults per process, and if possible the read an write separately. –  Renan Vinícius Mozone Jun 18 '10 at 16:40
    
PSLIST "process" -m can give you a more detailed list of memory usage, but I'm not aware of a utility that can break down a process that granularly for you. –  Tsynapse Jun 18 '10 at 17:51
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See here: http://serverfault.com/questions/7406/monitoring-hard-faults-on-windows-server-2003-using-perfmon

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Massimo, the thread you indicated show how to monitor the overall hard faults. My question is about to monitor hard faults for each process. –  Renan Vinícius Mozone Jun 18 '10 at 16:44
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You can use perfmon to monitor Page Faults\sec per process (which is probably not what you're looking for) or you can monitor specific I/O counters per process (which would include network, file, and device I\O's).

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