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I've got a 2k3 functional level domain environment. I'd like to use group policy to deploy a few registry settings.

I know that this can be done through GP Preferences client side extentions (which means deploying and validating the deployment of that CSE installer, which I'd prefer to avoid) and through a GP deployed start-up script (which feels a little clugey, and will take forever to apply). I'd much rather create a central admx or adm template that I can use to manage the settings I need.

Group policy in a lot of cases is just a happy interface for a lot of different registry settings. Can I just take a random admx file and modify it for my needs? What are the syntax pitfalls I should be concerned with? Is there a reference guide that I'm just missing?

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GP Preferences are so ridiculously useful that I'd hesitate to work around them. Plenty of work has been done in deploying the CSE easily. If you have WSUS already, you can download Feature Packs and then approve the updates for the Client Side Extensions.

http://msmvps.com/blogs/cgross/archive/2008/12/16/installing-group-policy-preferences-client-side-extensions.aspx

The above link also includes a GPO startup script to install it if you don't have WSUS, but I agree that it's a kludge. Below is another example script.

Example through computer startup script: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winserverManagement/thread/5f9f5658-2eca-4e10-9ab2-9c3ee048d9af

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Try using NUTS. It has a REG to ADM utility.

http://www.bing.com/search?q=network+administrators+utilities+set&form=QBRE&qs=n&sk=

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