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The linux kernel credits are in many cases years old, and even when you find someone who seems like a logical fit (don't pester the guy who did virtual memory stuff if you want a serial driver) the contact information is no longer valid.

[edit] This would be short term contract work, for a USB/serial device. It's using the FTDI chipset in MPSSE mode (talking to an i2c radio chip). Linux of course sees the FTDI chip, and brings it up as two plain serial ports. If the ftdi driver were modified to recognize the specific device, and not treat it as a plain serial, and allow some rudimentary configuration of the radio from userspace, that would be all that I need. Access to windows source code (C#) that does this and to the hardware would be provided. I just don't know where to start to look for someone. Kernel code is out of my league.

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closed as off topic by MikeyB, Chris S, ThatGraemeGuy, Zypher, Mark Henderson Jul 15 '10 at 2:28

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If it's a driver of some kind, I think it's not quite the same as kernel hacking. It would be built as just a module. There's a book or two that specializes in writing kernel modules (I thought) off Amazon/B&N...device drivers, from what I understand, are slightly easier than getting someone to hack into the kernel code for Linux :-) –  Bart Silverstrim Jul 15 '10 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

http://careers.stackoverflow.com/

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They want $350 to post a job ad, and $500 to even browse resumes. This is without any guarantee of finding anyone... I can't justify that if all I ever find are MCSE boot camp graduates. –  John O Jul 14 '10 at 14:16
    
@John, I just saw your response under Warner's Answer; you should edit that into the original question as I thought you were looking to hire someone full time, at which point $350 is pretty cheap considering. Bart's Answer has suggestions that will be of the most value to you. –  Chris S Jul 14 '10 at 14:20
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Many of the same methods for hiring full time can be applied to both part time workers and locating a consultant. Once he sees the rates a Linux kernel hacker will want, he might not be so intimidated by the $350. –  Warner Jul 14 '10 at 14:34
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The reason I was suggesting the mailing list is because they have domain-specific knowledge; the kernel is not a project for the average freelancer, really. They have familiarity. Browsing names from the mailing list should give you some leads, as some of the active participants may have web sites you can contact them personally. You don't need to troll, just get contacts. Otherwise contact companies that specialize in distros (Ubuntu, Red Hat) and see if they'll have some contract work for your specific issue. –  Bart Silverstrim Jul 14 '10 at 14:39
    
@John O: SO Careers has a money back guarantee. The FAQ says "We don't want your money if you're not amazingly happy." –  Dennis Williamson Jul 15 '10 at 1:17

Linux.org has some user groups you can contact.

The linux kernel mailing list and kernel.org probably has names you can contact. I'd google a bit for "linux kernel mailing list" and that should find some currently involved kernel hackers.

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Kernel.org itself doesn't seem to have much. The mailing list is for actual coding discussions, I can't spam them. And likewise, I don't think I can just randomly send off individual emails to everyone on it either. –  John O Jul 14 '10 at 14:20

You would hire someone to write Linux kernel code as you would any other person. As with other hiring, you seek areas specific to the skill-set you are attempting to hire for and recruit there.

This can include user groups, mailing lists (as Bart recommended), USENIX/SAGE job boards, careers.stackoverflow.com, Craigslist, your network, Monster/Dice, and many other places.

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This would be short term contract work, for a USB/serial device. It's using the FTDI chipset in MPSSE mode (talking to an i2c radio chip). Linux of course sees the FTDI chip, and brings it up as two plain serial ports. If the ftdi driver were modified to recognize the specific device, and not treat it as a plain serial, and allow some rudimentary configuration of the radio from userspace, that would be all that I need. Access to windows source code (C#) that does this and to the hardware would be provided. I just don't know where to start to look for someone. Kernel code is out of my league. –  John O Jul 14 '10 at 14:11
    
Plenty of people program C. That's the main skill you need. –  Warner Jul 14 '10 at 14:33
    
I was figuring it would cost us $1500 - 3000. Maybe a bit more, that's acceptable. But if I go to Monster/Dice, SO jobs and so forth, those $350s and $500s are going to spend that much easily, and I won't have found anyone. –  John O Jul 14 '10 at 15:16

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