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I expect something simple like "put2clip c:\boot.ini" which would result in the same thing as right-clicking in explorer the boot.ini file and select 'copy'.

i looked at nirsoft's nircmd, thinkingms.com/pensieve/2009/03/14/ClipexeACommandLineToolForTheWindowsClipboard.aspx and steve.org.uk/Software/clipboard/ bot none of them seems to do the work or provide good documentation.

thanks.

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I'm quite frustrated with this 'reputation' system, so therefore I can only comment and not vote down your answer: please don't answer unless you actually have an answer. I made my statement quite clear which makes your answer truly pointless. It's obvious I want an OBJECT "which would result in the same thing as right-clicking in explorer the boot.ini file and select 'copy'." Regarding the windows version, not specifying a version means I'm referring to ANY supported version at the time of question. –  user48831 Jul 22 '10 at 6:58
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update: I've received an email from Roshan James author of alternate clip.exe but the procedure and syntax is quite a pain: cd myfolder first, then clip files filename.exe copy –  user48831 Jul 22 '10 at 7:03

1 Answer 1

You don't specify which flavour of Windows, but anything from Vista/2003 onwards should work doing this:

echo blah | clip

or

type myTextFile.txt | clip

However, I am not aware of a way to put an object (like a file (jpg, mp3, ini, etc)) into the clipboard from the command line using native tools.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm quite frustrated with this 'reputation' system, so therefore I can only comment and not vote down your answer: please don't answer unless you actually have an answer. I made my statement quite clear which makes your answer truly pointless. It's obvious I want an OBJECT "which would result in the same thing as right-clicking in explorer the boot.ini file and select 'copy'." Regarding the windows version, not specifying a version means I'm referring to ANY supported version at the time of question. –  user48831 Jul 22 '10 at 6:58

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