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I have a web app set up that needs the following SSL encryption:

secure.myapp.com -> SSL
www.myapp.com/login -> SSL
www.myapp.com/signup -> SSL

If I'm correct, I could run one SSL certificate for my whole www.myapp.com/* pages. The problem is that I have a subdomain called secure.myapp.com that either needs to be on a separate IP address to work with SSL.

Right now I have one server, one public IP and a number of Virtual Hosts in apache to make this work.

I'd rather not buy an expensive Wildcard SSL certificate to secure just one subdomain. What is your advice on this? If it IS the only solution any tips on getting a price worthy wildcard SSL cert is appreciated.

I have read about SNI that allows the use of multiple SSL certs, but not all browsers (IE6!) support this. Since we are building a web app for the public, we cannot have IE6 to run on unencrypted connections.

Thanks for you help

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possible duplicate of SSL certificate selection based on host-header: is it possible? –  Warner Jul 27 '10 at 14:02

1 Answer 1

You could use UCC certificate, which can hold a number of domains rather than just 1 or n.

Costs about 100 dollars, I know GoDaddy sells them: http://www.godaddy.com/ssl/ssl-certificates.aspx?ci=9039

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what's the compatibility compared to SNI? –  solsol Jul 27 '10 at 9:23
    
It think it is the same, from what I'm reading now. More info here: comodo.com/e-commerce/ssl-certificates/exchange-ssl.php –  tore- Jul 27 '10 at 9:36
    
the same would suck as SNI doesn't support IE6+IE7 on XP correctly. Will look in to it more! –  solsol Jul 27 '10 at 10:16
    
I would recommend sending an mail to Go Daddy and just ask :) –  tore- Jul 28 '10 at 12:39

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