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I am currently hosting a website within my university environment with the permission from my university sysadmins. This is my scenario:

I am running a DNS server on my own and I am using one of the hosting provider's DNS server to point my DNS name to the IP address of the machine in which I am hosting the website. It all works well.

Now when I am running postfix and try to deliver mail to a gmail or an hotmail id, the mail is not delivered. When I ran dig -x with my IP address, I found the IP address is pointing to my university assigned FQDN of my machine not the one I want (mydomain.com). Looking up the same in ajaxdns.com gave me the same results.

My question is:

How can I change the reverse dns records to point my IP address to my domain and not the university domain under which my site is hosted? Will I have to run my own DNS server to accomplish this?

As you have figured out by this questions, I am quite new to this area. Looking forward to your help.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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How can I change the reverse dns records to point my IP address to my domain and not the university domain under which my site is hosted? Will I have to run my own DNS server to accomplish this?

Most likely the University owns the reverse zone for their address space and only they can change this record. Start by asking the university sysadmins if they will update the record for you. They will need the IP address, and the name you want that IP to point to.

If they are willing to cooperate, they could delegate authority to a DNS server you control. But it will be easier for them to just set the record to whatever that you need it to be.

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Thanks for this Zoredache, I shall talk to university people and see how it works. So after delegation of control to the DNS server in my control, I should set up a reverse dns in that dns server. Is that right? –  user5203 Jun 2 '09 at 0:25
    
Thanks for this. I just checked that there were some directory issues with postfix, because of which I was not able send mail. I fixed that. Moreover I feel I should also fix the reverse-dns issue just in case. –  user5203 Jun 2 '09 at 6:20

I think the problem is with google. Gmail isn't a mail transfer agent (MTA) and it usually likes it when real people send mail through it and not servers.

See if sSMTP helps http://wiki.debian.org/sSMTP

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