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Coming from question SQL Server 2008 connection tagged under sql-server-2008-express

Chris S wrote in SQL Server 2008 R2 vs. SQL Server 2008 R2 Express:

  • "The biggest different I see others have missed is that Express does not accept network connections (only local ones)"

I am having difficulties to find reference where is it written. Can you give me one?

What are "network connections (only local ones)" - on the same network, in the same AD, inside the same developing machine? Can they be from the same workgroup Windows computer?

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closed as not a real question by MDMarra, EEAA, Zypher, squillman, Kara Marfia Aug 29 '10 at 5:08

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Wow, -4 in a minute! Thanks for downvoting. But I am missing the point from this anonymous guidance - what is the message. Express can or not be connected remotely? –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Aug 29 '10 at 4:03
    
I case others can't find the Answer he's referring to, I delete it as it was wrong; I had been misinformed. –  Chris S Sep 1 '10 at 17:37
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not anywhere because you can access SQL server express from the network. It's just not turned on by default, you need to enable network connections manually.

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It is the same in any edition of MS SQL Server –  Gennady Vanin Novosibirsk Aug 29 '10 at 3:52
    
No. It started I think with 2008 ;) Older versions have it on by default ;) –  TomTom Aug 29 '10 at 8:57
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