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SQL Server Files Local or NAS or SAN?

Hi,

I have just bought a NAS (NETGEAR Stora) for our home office - 2 Windows PCs.

I want to run a small database that both machines can access. I am building a c# winform app that is going to access it and I was hoping the entire database could reside on the NAS. Can you install SQL Server on a NAS? Is this possible or would one of the machines instead have to have SQL installed and then have the sql files on the NAS instead. The reason I was wanting to have the entire sql on the NAS was becuase then only the nas would need to be turned on and not have to rely on both the sql hosting pc and the NAS.

If it can be done how do i do it? Just point to the NAS during installation or...?

Any advice appreciated

thanks

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marked as duplicate by splattne Sep 4 '10 at 11:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

No. Your NAS is a 'dumb storage' device, not a server capable of hosting a piece of software like SQL.

As a storage device, it's also file-level rather than block-level (you cannot ask the device for only a small piece of a file, you have to take/put the whole file at once), which means you can't have concurrent access from multiple sources just by placing your data files onto the device. This is something you'd need a block-level file sharing system for (e.g. iSCSI/Fiber Channel SAN)

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I agree in theory, but recently, the lines between traditional SANs and NASs are being blurred. More and more NASs support iSCSI and many SAN vendors are now support file-level services. The moral here I guess is that to support a SQL datastore, the OP needs block-level storage, not file-level, no matter what the "class" of the underlying device is. –  EEAA Sep 4 '10 at 4:15
    
That's for sure. There's no consensus on the definition of SAN or NAS (or at least, the difference), which makes navigating that whole topic quite unpleasant. –  Chris Thorpe Sep 4 '10 at 4:32

Already asked and answered:

http://serverfault.com/questions/591/sql-server-files-local-or-nas-or-san

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Do not post non-answers as answers. Post them as comments on the original question. Once you have enough rep, you'll be able to flag for closure. –  EEAA Sep 4 '10 at 4:11
    
thanks. I read that link before I posted it recommends not to use a NAS but does not say whether it can be done or not which was my question. –  kurasa Sep 4 '10 at 4:26
    
@ErikA Noted. Can you put that in the FAQ please? Should I delete this answer? –  Rob Olmos Sep 4 '10 at 4:35
    
@kurasa I see. I recommend against as well with the NETGEAR Stora. Please note the related question in your question and why it doesn't fully answer your question. –  Rob Olmos Sep 4 '10 at 4:38
    
@Rob - ???..."Please note the related question in your question and why it doesn't fully answer your question" - I thought my comment already did. It is a different question. It asks where to put the SLQ files (mdf, ldf) not whether the NAS can host SQL server which is what I am asking. Am I misunderstnding your comment to my comment in my question to your reference to the link of the other question? ...enough. I unsubscribe ;) –  kurasa Sep 4 '10 at 4:51

It is a different question. It asks where to put the SLQ files (mdf, ldf) not whether the NAS can host SQL server which is what I am asking. - kurasa

It looks like the only access you get to Stora is a web interface so I doubt you can install anything other than the packages they provide.

Secondly, most Netgear stuff runs Linux and actually if you look here:

http://kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/2649

You can see that the Stora (MS2110) has GPL code available to download. Upon inspecting it, it's all Linux so I doubt you can install SQL Server on it :)

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