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Can anyone please recommend any good Load Testing software? I have a website which updates scores every minute via ajax calls and need a load testing software which supports ajax calls (javascript) too!

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Exactly what do you want to test. "Load testing" is really vague. –  John Gardeniers Sep 13 '10 at 12:47
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7 Answers

iMacros for Firefox fully supports AJAX, but it is not a dedicated load testing tool. Still, you can use it easily to run 10-30 instances of Firefox per PC. This way you can simulate 30 concurrent users per PC - sounds small, but that is quite a lot already (unless you work for Expedia or Google)

concurrent = (visits_per_month * average_time_on_site) / (3600 * 24 * 30)

So if you e.g. have 15,000 visits per month, and the average visitor spends 3 minutes on your site (180 seconds), it means your average number of concurrent visitors will be (15000 * 180) / (3600 * 24 * 30) = 1.04 or just over 1 visitor. However, this is the average number of visitors your site will have. Usually, peak hour traffic will be a lot higher and low traffic hours a lot lower. How much higher peak traffic is than average traffic can vary depending on what site you have, just as average time on site will vary depending on the type of site you have.

So for many sites, a browser macro tool like iMacros is sufficient for load testing.

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? visitors!=hits –  symcbean Sep 13 '10 at 14:30
    
I mean visitors - but not UNIQUE visitors. Hits is per page element, and that is taken care of by the web browser already (it always loads all elements) –  MFauser Sep 13 '10 at 16:11
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you can use ab from the apache webserver to test load via http

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AFAIK, there are no tools which realistically support ajax testing (but interested to hear if anyone knows different). There are lots which claim to - but in practice they tend to fall into 2 camps - those which merely generate HTTP calls to an Ajax service, and ones which attempt to automate a browser (and usually fail, are hard to script if its possible at all, and provide very little realistic performance metrics).

Generating HTTP traffic and measuring performance is trivial though. There are lots of tools available, e.g. http::recorder + www::mechanize (perl), and lots more listed here

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You can use standard load testing tools to do this, you just need to add the URLs to your back-end services to the list of URLs for the application to hit from time to time along with your front-end pages.

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Try jmeter if it's a web based aplication. If not, please add more details about what you want to test.

Apache JMeter is open source software, a 100% pure Java desktop application designed to load test functional behavior and measure performance. It was originally designed for testing Web Applications but has since expanded to other test functions.

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You can use WebLOAD from http://www.radview.com/, it works well with Ajax, and uses JavaScript as the scripting language

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"AFAIK, there are no tools which realistically support ajax testing (but interested to hear if anyone knows different). There are lots which claim to - but in practice they tend to fall into 2 camps - those which merely generate HTTP calls to an Ajax service, and ones which attempt to automate a browser (and usually fail, are hard to script if its possible at all, and provide very little realistic performance metrics)."

See HP TruClient in LoadRunner for a solution which has full AJAX support. However, given the definition of a business process which simply updates every minute it should be easy to emulate this traffic with a straight HTTP virtual user from any number of commercial or open source tools and a timer structure which holds for a period of time before updating.

If this update in the client is running concurrent with other actions, i.e. frame 1 is user input and frame 2 is an AJAX solution constantly updating, then you do have a bit more of a mechanical challenge on the tool front. You can go either the full AJAX route or decouple the updating content from the user interaction in two scripts. Something to keep in mind that when you do find a client type which is fully AJAX compliant you also inherit the weight of a full browser, the javascript engine and the the majority of the rendering engine. That weight is translated to use of memory and use of CPU, so you will not get as many virtual users per host.

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