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I have an AWS EC2 account and I am running an instance that serves as a web host for my PHP website. This is a private website that has no UI but only URLs to be requested by my other software to get some response from the server.

I want the requests (that I send to the server) to be secured so I want to use https instead of http. so what should I do to achieve that?

PS: I found this link while searching but I don't know how useful it's in my situation http://matt-darby.com/posts/690-aws-ec2-and-ssl

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Still waiting for a reply please –  Aubada Taljo Sep 18 '10 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

Your question is too general to answer properly. You don't specify even what Operating system you are running. Being on EC2 has nothing to do with this, the procedure is the same for setting up a secure web site anywhere. General steps:

  1. Setup your web server software to handle https including opening ports and setting up the host configuration
  2. setup server host keys
  3. generate a csr (certificate signing requestion)
  4. purchase a SSL cert from an issuing authority using the csr you generated
  5. install the cert they issue on your server

This site is not for complete tutorials to very general problems, especially when you haven't even defined a problem. You will have better luck getting answers to more specific questions.

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I wrote a weblog entry for you that shows how to do it, but requires you open port 443 through the firewall to the Apache server: http://djangofan.blogsite.org/wordpress/?p=85 . Using this method, a browser will not recognize the certificate as a valid certificate, but it will still be encrypted regardless.

Also, I recommend opening port 22 to your EC2 instance and then using Bitwise Tunnelier to SSH into your instances.

NOTE: in my weblog entry, it requires that you know how to install OpenSSL and configure its properties correctly. its not too challenging but I thought I should warn you.

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Would you mind posting the gist of your blog post as part of your answer ? If your blog goes away, this answer becomes less than useful. –  Iain May 18 '11 at 20:43

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