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I want to setup a DNS server. Which one has the easiest to use GUI?

I've been looking at djbdns and powerdns and I can't decide.

I used bind before, but I hated the webmin GUI for it, and the security bugs scare me because I don't upgrade all the time.

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closed as off topic by Iain Dec 25 '12 at 9:25

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Is this for Linux, Windows built-in DNS is very easy - not great but easy. –  Chopper3 Jun 2 '09 at 22:06
    
@Chopper3 its just for Linux. –  Unknown Jun 2 '09 at 22:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're more likely to find a decent Web UI for PowerDNS purely because it can use a database backend. As far as I'm aware, djbdns doesn't have support for any backend beyond its file based one.

This forum lists a collection of PowerDNS front ends. No idea if they're any good or not.

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A fair number of people seem to like "PowerAdmin" GUI (poweradmin.org) for PowerDNS. –  KPWINC Jun 3 '09 at 2:54

I wouldn't recommend installing software you don't have the time to maintain. I'd also like to point out that you won't come across software that does not have the occasional nasty vulnerability, particularly where the internet is concerned.

May I ask what drives you toward the GUI? Text-based configuration can require some time and patience, but what in IT doesn't? It also seems rather futile setting up a GUI to configure something that should largely be a set-and-forget configuration. You may end up spending more time setting up the GUI than actually configuring the server.

Ehtyar.

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This doesn't answer the question. They want to know what gui's are available. –  spuder Nov 4 at 17:44

In terms of GUI, Windows DNS is unparalleled. It's simple, clear, straightforward, and easy. I use it for my internal DNS without reservation.

I would think long and hard before I used it externally as the authoritative DNS for my external domain, though. Windows' security history makes me hesitant to trust a server out on the net, even though plenty of people do it every day and don't get their servers cracked. It's probably my relative unfamiliarity with the OS that leads me to this prejudice.

But if GUI is your only concern, there's nothing I've seen easier than Windows DNS server.

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My personal choice would be djbdns as the configuration is clear and simple. For GUI needs there is VegaDNS and NicTool.

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-1 for djbdns - It has security problems out of the box (Check the CVE database) and it doesn't do DNSSEC. –  Mark Johnson Dec 25 '12 at 5:26
    
@MarkJohnson I think it's a bit harsh to downvote my answer just because you seem to have an issue with djb. The original question mentioned djbdns and PowerDNS and I gave my preference of those two with pointers to GUI tools. –  karttu Jan 4 '13 at 8:39
    
I downvoted your answer because you're recommending software that: 1) needs patches for security vulnerabilities out of the box (which you're apparently not aware of, since you didn't mention them) 2) Does not support DNSSEC. –  Mark Johnson Jan 5 '13 at 1:58
    
Question didn't specify "dns servers not containing vulnerabilities", nor did the question mention DNSSEC. They are only asking about GUIs –  spuder Nov 4 at 18:17

My apologies, the accepted answer regarding PowerDNS gave me the impression that only free DNS options were under consideration. Sorry, my bad. I would certainly agree with Matt Simmons that Windows Server DNS is unparalleled for usability from a GUI environment. However, in order to keep it updated with the latest security patches, the machine will need to have ~10 minutes downtime each month, and if you don't want to be touching your server as you mentioned, Windows is probably not the best way to go if you ask me.

Ehtyar.

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Please see the tutorial for the best syntax for answering questions. serverfault.com/tour –  spuder Nov 4 at 17:46

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