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I'm trying to save disk space on a database server. I've found there are 12GB of cache files for the data collection system, but I don't know why. Of the two data collection sets running, one is cached and one isn't.

What would be the impact if I changed it to non-cached? Would I get the 12GB back, and would it have a negative effect elsewhere?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

2 of the 3 SQL Server 2008 Performance Data Warehouse Data Collections set (Query Stats and Server Activity) use the "cached" settings by default. The data collector jobs should be deleting the cache when it uploads to the data warehouse database, which is every 15 minutes.

I would first check to make sure your data collector jobs are all running within SQL Agent. They will usually have names like:

collection_set_1_noncached_collect_and_upload collection_set_2_collection collection_set_2_upload collection_set_3_collection collection_set_3_upload

Let me know if those are running.

Thanks, Dan

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collection_set_1_noncached... and both collection_set_3 jobs are running. I checked the logs for the data collection sets, and the noncached one has been having errors since our disk space problems began (although they are resolved now...) - it seemed it had trouble writing to a file (perhaps disk space problem there too?) –  pete the pagan-gerbil Sep 22 '10 at 8:43
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Accepted in the absence of any other suggestions! Determined in the end this must have been down to a server/network hiccup, files were not being updated and not being used and nothing complained when I deleted them. –  pete the pagan-gerbil Dec 15 '10 at 15:58
    
Glad to hear everything is back to normal. –  SQL3D Dec 15 '10 at 18:31

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