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I have a domain connected Windows XP laptop user who is not a local administrator. I would like for him to be able to change his IP address on Windows XP since he travels quite a bit and may encounter networks which may or may not have DHCP enabled.

Ability to change IP addresses is currently restricted by AD policy.

Is there a straightforward way to achieve this for just this specific user?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you were to do it for a number of users, the most efficient way would be to run net localgroup "Network Configuration Operators" /add <user> on the machine they're using. Perhaps stick it in a logon script or something.

Ehtyar.

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Shouldn't need it in a login script; once the user is added to the group they should be there permanently unless explicitly removed. –  Lawrence Dol Apr 24 '13 at 19:33

On Vista and Windows 7, it's simply a matter of adding them to the local "Network Configuration Operators" group.

This does not exist on Windows XP and the only supportable way to change network configurations is with administrator access. I'm sure you could hack registry permissions and tweak things to make it work, but that is likely to be a support nightmare when the user is remote.

Local Administrator is the only reliable method for Windows XP.

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The group also exists on Windows XP computers. –  Benoit Jun 3 '09 at 6:37
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Actually XP does have the Network Configuration Operators group, there is no need to grant full administrator privileges. –  ThatGraemeGuy Jun 3 '09 at 6:38
    
Well, evidently I forgot that one pretty quickly, and should check my facts before blurting :) –  Froosh Jun 5 '09 at 5:39

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