Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Need to test if an application has correctly implemented active directory remote authentication single-sign-on requests? If you don't know of a tool, what would be a checklist of items to confirm are in place?

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason you can't test this with an actual AD? –  John Gardeniers Oct 11 '10 at 2:41
    
@John_Gardeniers: Yes, basically I have a solution that I want to test before suggesting it to a company. Meaning I don't want to say I'm able to I'm able to then find out that I'm not. NOTE: DUPLICATED FROM COMMENT BELOW. –  blunders Oct 11 '10 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about a 180-day trial license for Windows Server 2008 R2?

Honestly, that's probably your best bet. I've never heard of an "Active Directory simulator". It's easy enough to just spin up a trial version of the OS, set up your users, and then test on a real, live version of the software.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting suggestion, but I'm just trying to test a config, not setup and learn Active Directory just to test SSO. I did a Google search before, and it appears that their are "Active Directory simulators" and hoping someone knows about testing an implemention without having to deploy a full version. (Basically I have a solution that I want to test before suggesting it to a company. Meaning I don't want to say I'm able to I'm able to then find out that I'm not.) –  blunders Oct 10 '10 at 19:39
    
@blunders if you want to be able to confidently say that you support AD Authentication, then you need to test against AD. Any kind of emulation/mimic wouldn't be a good enough test. If you were comfortable with such a basic level of testing, then you may as well test against any old LDAP implementation. –  Chris Thorpe Oct 10 '10 at 20:16
    
Setting up a very basic AD is laughably simple. Literally install the OS, run through the 'add roles' wizard that pops up when you first log on, and follow the wizard. All the settings are configured for you automatically and all you do is set the domain name and admin password. –  Chris Thorpe Oct 10 '10 at 20:17

The answers to this question should point you to a few alternatives (mainly LDAP-based): OpenDS, ApacheDS, OpenLDAP and AD LDS...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.