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I just switched my sites over from shared hosting to what I thought was a step up ( dedicated ). One of my websites is built on Wordpress and already I am having problems with the folder permissions. I was told that only 770 would work on the wp-content folder. My email with them is a pain.

I have been building websites for a little under 3 years now and have used many different hosting providers depending on the client. <- And I'm tired of hosting companies ( mainly for my personal sites ).

However, I have very little server experience, BUT I am willing to learn.

So my Question: I pay 50 bucks a month for hosting and deal with too many problems. Would I be intelligent to buy my own server and go from there?

The way I see it: I would save in the long run ( big time ) and have my server sitting right next to me. I need to host only about three sites, with each needing their own email.

I have residential cable, but it's blazing fast. <- It could easily handle the traffic of my three sites.

Please let me know if I'm crazy :)

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3 Answers 3

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Hosting is the easy part as in terms of horsepower unless you're running something pretty bandwidth/traffic intensive you can run a website on pretty much anything.

The difficult part for us to answer is whether your home cable connection is reliable enough for what you're trying to achieve.

Then you have all the fun stuff like where to put it (does your router have a DMZ interface?), whether the TOS of your ISP lets you run a web server, whether you're on a static IP or a dynamic IP and how you have your DNS setup to reflect the latter.

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What if I have a dynamic IP, does that shoot a whole in the entire thing? –  Matt Tokoly Oct 11 '10 at 17:14
    
I think I understand what you saying: 1. I need to check if my router has the DMZ interface. 2. Then whether or not I'm allowed to even run a webserver. 3. set it up according to whether or not I have a static or dynamic ip –  Matt Tokoly Oct 11 '10 at 17:20
    
Yes to your last comment essentially. Tbh, unless you've a really good reason to do so, I'd just stick with shared hosting or get a VPS or something - we have lots of bandwidth and decent infrastructure where I work but I'd still prefer to just use an external host for website stuff. –  Hutch Oct 11 '10 at 17:26

Assuming that you'd be hosting these sites for paying clients, then in short, yes, you're crazy. :) If they're your own personal sites, then you'll need to determine if you want to deal with many of the potential issues that come along with hosting at home.

Hosting from home (even if it's for non-critical sites) is a bad idea. Power, cooling, noise, lack of redundancy, etc, are just a few of the issues you have going against you. There are also legal issues you'll need to contend with. Does your ISP's AUP allow you to use your non-business connection for commercial purposes?

I'd recommend sticking with your dedicated host or possibly moving back to shared hosting. What prompted you to move away from shared hosting in the first place? The issues you mentioned are, most likely, very easy to resolve. Just submit another question or two specific to each issue (and including ample detail on the problem) and we'll help you sort things out in no time.

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I would determine hosting needs based on the time invested on maintaining the site from an operations standpoint. Dedicated or Shared (in the cloud) are essentially the same in terms of what you get with a few exceptions on performance requirements.

I think the deciding factor may be budget vs time spent managing the application. If it is mission critical and the core of your business what you might want to do is find a managed hosting solution. The word managed usually defines that they are liable for the systems uptime and application. Check which providers will be able to monitor and maintain a quality SLA policy for the application running and be able to maintain this 24x7x365.

There would most likely be a cost increase of around 3x the current price you may be paying but if it comes to piece of mind and you focusing on the core of your business it might become worth it.

Let me know if you need a list of providers whom offer these type of services, you can also check on the Wordpress website under their hosting section.

Best of luck, Nick

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