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I am considering writing a web application in python, rather than more traditional PHP or ASP.net MVC. For my application (which will be opensource) to be useful, I need it to run in paid hosting environments. In other words, if some company wants to use my app for free, they will typically upload the app to their PAID web host.

I already know PHP comes with just about any Linux package. My question is : Is Python just as common an option in the Linux hosting world?

Lets not completely dismiss Windows hosting either. I know its technically possible to configure IIS to run Python, but is it common for Windows Hosting Packages to include Python as part of the available programming languages options.

I'm trying to get a good feel for this, before I commit to using Python because I want my open source app to be used by a wide as possible audience. I'm also very keen to use Python, because it will be a fun and interesting undertaking.

Thanks in advance.

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Is Python just as common? No. Java, .NET, and PHP are the most common. The web implementations are stable and entrenched. I don't know about Windows, but in all of the Linux operating systems I've used, a working PHP page is just a few simple steps away.

Python with Django are now my preferred tools for the Web. It is very easy to get started, but there are lots of challenges the first time you deploy to a production environment. On the plus side, the documentation is pretty good and there are several deployment options.

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we run a dev environment project at kodingen with hosting accounts created for each user. We reached to 10k websites as we speak, and we find it 100x harder to run python than php.

that aside, 9 out of 10 hosting providers use plesk, cpanel kind of hosting automation software and none of those comes prepared to run python. even when they do, it's usually not enough to satisfy the most regular python project's needs.

we will roll private server's feature very soon, so python people can create their own environments. from this perspective i can safely say that php outreach will be beyond python. if you are not using something in python that php does not offer, stick with php for widest audience goal, as your question is not "which language is better" for your particular purpose.

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