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I see that pinging my domain returns "n bytes from xyz.members.linode.com", which gives away too much for my taste. On the other hand, I've pinged plenty of domains that just return "something.domain.com". Is it possible to configure a VPS to have this behavior? If so, how?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you register domain.com, whoever looks after the reverse mapping for your VPS' IP-address in DNS should be able to make the reverse DNS lookups for that IP-address resolve to something.domain.com.

Of course, people will probably still be able to work out that the IP-address of your VPS comes from a block of IP-addresses allocated to linode.com.

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When a machine receives a packet, it does not know the name of the source. It knows only the IP address of it. So it must ask for the PTR record via DNS in order to learn the name associated with it. Therefore you must ask your hosting provider to configure "reverse DNS" for your server appropriately. –  adamo Nov 4 '10 at 22:43
    
Thanks for your answer. (I'm not allowed to accept it yet.) I need to pick up some nice book on DNS... Out of curiosity, could the reverse DNS lookup resolve to the naked domain domain.com? –  eze Nov 4 '10 at 22:47
    
Yes it can resolve back to the "naked" domain. Start with "DNS for Rocket Scientists" zytrax.com/books/dns –  adamo Nov 4 '10 at 22:52
    
Thanks for your reply and the link, adamo! –  eze Nov 4 '10 at 23:21
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You can configure the PTR record for linode in their control panel.

In the "Remote Access" tab, look for a link labelled "Reverse DNS" in the "Public IPs" section.

The address would be https://manager.linode.com/linodes/rdns/[your linode name].

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