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I'm trying to build a Xen domU that can be connected through the Xen's VNC server. Below is the template (actually it's generated by OpenNebula):

name = 'one-153'
#O CPU_CREDITS = 256
memory  = '128'
bootloader = "/usr/bin/pygrub"
disk = ['tap:aio:/home/oneadmin/cloud/one/var/153/images/disk.0,xvda,w',]
vif = ['mac=02:00:c0:a8:00:03,bridge=virbr0',]
vfb = ['type=vnc,vnclisten=slave1,vncdisplay=1,vncpasswd=v98KXdFN']

The problem is that I can't connect to the domU if it doesn't have X. In this case all I got is a blank screen. Besides, if the domU has X, the screen is still blank until the login prompt appears, while it should be like this.

Some information that may be useful:

  • The domU and the dom0 both run CentOS 5.5.
  • If the domU has X, it can be connected even when both X and the domU's VNC server isn't running.
  • The VNC client is RealVNC.
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Quite odd ... Lets say that your Dom0 is 1.1.1.1 and your guest is 1.1.1.2 ... You are trying to connect to 1.1.1.1:1, right ? Try removing vnclisten=slave1. –  Torian Nov 9 '10 at 3:41
    
I tried but it didn't work. By the way slave1 is dom0 –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 9 '10 at 7:32
    
On Dom0, what is the output of 'netstat -tnl | grep :59' ? This should at least return a line telling that vnc server is listening on port 5901. –  Torian Nov 9 '10 at 15:14
    
The output is tcp 0 0 192.168.44.130:5901 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN. –  Hai Minh Nguyen Nov 10 '10 at 5:41
    
update you question with the output of "iptables -L -n" –  Torian Nov 16 '10 at 17:25

1 Answer 1

So VNC needs an X-server. When I look at the services started by vnc (xinetd on CentOS 5) there is alway X involved.

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1  
VNC needs something to provide session content. X is the most common or most familiar. QEMU can be set to support VNC to its console and thus you'd have VNC to something that isn't actually X, and doesn't even need X in it. In theory you can make a VNC server serve any kind of content you can program. –  Skaperen Sep 1 '12 at 4:21

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