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I've got a SQL Server 2008 R2 instance running on a webserver and I'd like to monitor the running processes it's got or which locks it maintains. The SQL Server process will gradually (running a week or so) take up about 80-90% of the memory so there must be something hogging the server. Are there any standard tools for it or any third-party tools I could use?

TIA!

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2 Answers 2

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The SQL Server process will gradually (running a week or so) take up about 80-90% of the memory so there must be something hogging the server.

If I would get a cent every time someone did not read the documentation and asks this question, I would be a billionaire.

SQL Server, bya stanmdard configuration, uses ALL AVAILABLE MEMORY AS CACHE. To speed thigns up.

If you are not OK with that, go to the server properties and tell SQL Server how much memory it can use. It will gladly adhere to this.

Otherwise, again, every data read is cached. Point. Old pages are released as new ones read in.

Why

Because readingfomr discs is SLOW.

Most "real" sql server installs run on dedicated machines. Which makes teh default behavior HIGHLY desirable.

Nothing wrong here except the Admin did not care to configure SQL server properly ;)

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Lots of third party tools are available from Quest, Idera, SQLSentry to name but a few.

What you are suggesting sounds very much like normal behaviour though for SQL Server which will try and grab as much memory as it believes it requires. Your first best bet is to use Performance Monitor and log to file and analyse the results.

Have a look at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/298475 and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd672789.aspx

as a small selection...

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