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We're using Dropbox but in order to share files >2gb, each sharer must have premium Dropbox account. I resent this pricing model as it is unfair and am resolved to finding a more open solution.

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How is Dropbox's pricing "unfair"? Expensive? Perhaps, but that doesn't make it unfair. They set their prices where they want to and it's up to the market to decide whether or not it's a good value. –  EEAA Nov 23 '10 at 15:28
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I consider it quite fair. They generously provide a free service to people who don't need a lot of shared data. They fund this by charging a premium to users who require a larger shared resource. This is a common marketing model. The only thing really unfair, is that some users get a service for free. –  BillThor Nov 23 '10 at 18:20
    
Actually that's not the problem. The problem is we in our company have a shared folder, and we use dropbox to sync it, but it will cost each individual person $99 a year to participate in the share, which is too dear- you don't need very many people before it becomes cheaper to have your own file server. –  chrism2671 Nov 25 '10 at 8:59

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This is one of the best guides I've found on the topic. dropbox clone how to

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SparkleShare looks like they want to be the FOSS equivalent to dropbox, with clients for linux, Windows, and OS X. Unfortunately, it looks like they're still in the early stages and only have betas for linux and OS X; no Windows.

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