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I want to switch from a apache ReverseProxy to pound.

My problem is: There are rules in my proxy.conf like:
ProxyPass /lalelu http://internale/NOT_Lalelu

Now in pound I couldn´t figure out how to "map" this.
I can only:

Service
URL "/lalelu"
Backend
Adress internal
Port
End
End

Am I wright, or is there a way to map a directory to the root or to another directory?

Thanks

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I don't think pound is capable of that, unless there's new (since 2-3 years) features that does this. The config above would send a request with URI that starts with /lalelu to a certain backend(s), without rewriting the URI. –  3molo Nov 24 '10 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

Pound is really fast, stable, and simple. I found that BackEnd (proxy) and Redirect was all we needed. Pound's Redirect clause takes regular expressions.

The HTTP redirects are not the same as ProxyPass (because they do not hide the mapping from the user) but it will probably work for you too.

For your example it would be:

Service
  URL "^/lalelu"
  http://internale/NOT_Lalelu 
End

Service
  URL "/NOT_Lalelu"
  Backend
    Adress internal
    Port
  End
End 

Here are some other examples that we use:

Service
  HeadRequire "^Host: fmspbm\.ucr\.edu$"
  URL "^/?$"
  Redirect    "http://fmspbm.ucr.edu/binplone"
End

or

Service
  URL "^/(~|%7E)userxyz"
  HeadRequire "^Host: biocluster\.ucr\.edu$"
  Redirect    "http://biocluster.ucr.edu/~userx"
End
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this sounds good! The "^" is the regex Start-String ... right? –  Matthias Dec 10 '10 at 11:02
    
@Matthias, yes. –  Aleksandr Levchuk Dec 10 '10 at 20:29

The advantage of using Apache is that you get excellent URL (and content) rewriting capabilities.

If you're moving away from mod_proxy for performance reasons, you may want to look at Varnish, although Varnish by itself doesn't do SSL (a typical solution uses stunnel, Pound, or Apache to provide the SSL services). Varnish can perform arbitrary regular-expression based rewriting on URLs (and also has load-balancing features).

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