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We have old servers that serve application using FoxPro database and it's currently still operating till today. The operating system is using Netware 4.11 and the client is dumb terminal (boot from network interface card).

1. Is it possible to access the volume on Netware server on Windows to be mount like network map drive? Because I'm totally newbie and blind in Novell Netware OS. I see that it's all under DOS command.

2. If it's possible can I read the .dbf files when all clients is running the application that using these databases from Windows? Because I'd like to monitor the records inside the tables

3. Do I need to install Netware Client? I just installed but have no plan what to do next?

If it is possible how to do that?

The server hardware used is Pentium II

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't have to install Novell Client for NetWare, because Windows XP contains an embedded client for it. To install it, you'll need to open Properties for the network connection and click Install..., then select Client and click Add... You'll have only one choice there, if the client isn't already installed, Client Service for NetWare.

It supports only IPX, so if your server runs IP only, you'll have to install the client from Novell. Make sure you configure the same IPX number for both the server and the client. On the server, it is set up in SYS;\SYSTEM\AUTOEXEC.NCF file. You can access it from the server's console by either loading INSTALL or NWCONFIG, or by editing it directly with EDIT:

LOAD EDIT SYS:\SYSTEM\AUTOEXEC.NCF

you'll find something like this in that file:

LOAD IPXRTR
LOAD RTSSRV.LAN SLOT=3 FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2  NAME=RTSSRV_1_E82
BIND IPX RTSSRV_1_E82 NET=10
LOAD IPXRTRNM

NET=10 is the IPX network number. Make sure it is the same in the properties of the client.

There is a way to configure the network on the server via, let me recall, INETCFG.NLM or a similar module (don't run it if you didn't). It moves commands that configure the network from AUTOEXEC.NCF to other initialization files. If your server is configured this way, and even if it isn't, you can find the IPX network number and other related information by issuing command CONFIG (not LOAD CONFIG, just CONFIG) from the console.

After you configure the client, the NetWare server will be visible for your Windows workstation like a Windows server. You can also map paths to it directly from Windows command line with commands similar to

net use j: \\netware42\sys /persistent:no

Guess that was the answer to questions 1 and 3.

2 Yes, basically, if your DOS programs do not access the server via NetWare APIs. If they do, install Novell client for NetWare, because the embedded client does not support most of the APIs

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NW4.11 only does NCP over IPX, not NCP over IP in the same way that NW5 and higher do. 4.1x support IP for backups, ftp, telnet, etc, but not for NCP. –  geoffc Nov 30 '10 at 18:26
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Your best bet here is to find a Windows XP machine (not Vista or Win7) and install the Novell Client to it. You can download it from Novell.com (link). Make sure the WinXP machine is on the same network subnet as your dumb terminal. During configuration, make sure you select "IP and IPX" as protocols, and make sure the "Server" field is the NW4.11 server. I assume you have login credentials. Login with those to the server.

That will at least get you into the server to do the FoxPro work. And for that Other People will have to answer, since I don't know FoxPro :}.

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For win7 x32 you need to use this Netware over IPX client:

http://www.fayloobmennik.net/3374580

http://turbobit.net/87kqatv0x7ke.html

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You might want to consider answering the individual questions as they're listed, for clarity. –  Drew Khoury Nov 25 '13 at 7:49
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