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I am using IIS 6.0 on Windows Server 2003. I want to learn what means recycle after "Fixed number of requests" in application pool setting? My current confusion is, suppose I set this number to 100, and the 99th person connects to my web site, than the 100th person comes and the 100th person will trigger application pool recycle rule of 100th requests, which means all session information for the 99th person will be lost (in-process session will expire when application pool worker process restarts)?

thanks in advance, George

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1 Answer 1

I see that you have already got some answers on Stack Overflow, there are two articles that helped me understand how to get round the issues with sessions in ASP.net specifically:

You shouldn't have to recycle the Application Pool on a regular basis, in your example it coulde easily be several times a minute. If you do need to for a technical reasons, then schedule it at a specific time such as 0400 in the morning.

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1. I think recycle at specific number of requests are very dangerous settings, why people need that? 2. If we disable recycle at specific number of requests handled, are there are side-effects? 3. what do you mean "in your example it coulde easily be several times a minute"? How do you calculate the result several times a minute? –  George2 Jun 7 '09 at 14:20
    
If as you suppose you set "Fixed number of requests" = 100, and at 12:32 100 users came you your site at once and requested 5 pages each between 12:32:00 and 12:32:59 that would generate 500 requests causing your application pool to reset 5 times in the space of one minute. The number might seem high, but when you factor in human nature and search bots the number of requests that happen in a one minute period rise rapidly. –  Richard Slater Jun 7 '09 at 16:48

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