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i need to add a linux to a network, and assign it a hostname in active directory. any clues on how to do that?

i know how to set things up on the windows box, but not how to give it a recognizable hostname within active directory (mapping the name to the IP).

any help is appreciated.l

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Can you give some more information? Version of Windows, detail on the linux box, how your network is setup? –  chotchki Dec 14 '10 at 3:40
    
You will need to use Samba in case you have to share files with windows network –  ArunMu Dec 14 '10 at 4:04
    
What linux distro are you using? There is likely to be specific documentation for each distribution. –  Matt Delves Dec 14 '10 at 4:09
    
Do you clarify what exacly do you need: just add linux to network, share files, authenticate via AD? –  rvs May 1 '11 at 9:39

1 Answer 1

First, make sure to sync the clock of your Linux box with the embedded NTP server of Active Directory.

Then, install the Kerberos 5 client, Samba and Winbind:

http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/Samba-HOWTO-Collection/winbind.html

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why does ntp need to be synced with active directory? –  okie.floyd Dec 15 '10 at 4:33
    
sorry, this cut me off. this linux box will just be a web server. but the guys on the network just need to be able to access it from their browsers (i.e. lnxbox/index.php). there will be no file sharing or anything like that. i can't just get linux & the router to set up a static ip, and then map that ip to a hostname in active directory? –  okie.floyd Dec 15 '10 at 4:35

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