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i have a machine with vista home premium and i wanted to share a folder with my colleagues

unfortunately i vista allow only 10 concurrent connections to a shared folder

one of my colleagues advised me to install a Virtual machine with windows server 2003 so that i will be able to share the folder with more than 1000 user.

another colleague stated that the kind of virtual server does not matter, what matters is the host OS, in this case vista. so the folder will be shared by no more than 10 users.

my Question is

Does Virtual Machines with Microsoft server 2003 with Host operating system Vista Home Premium suffer from Vista contraints?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A virtual machine is a completely isolated system, which doesn't share anything above the hardware level with the host system (or with other VMs running on the same host); so, as long as the host can provide hardware resources and network bandwidth, a guest system can do everything it wants.

Of course, you should have a proper server license for the guest O.S., and a number of client access licenses (CALs) appropriate for the number of users connecting to it; but this is only a commercial costraint, technically the guest O.S. could serve as many users as you want and the hardware can handle.

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The Server 2003 instance you run in your VM will have to be correctly licensed to be legal. If you have enough licenses for it, you can share to as many clients as you need. The sharing constraint Vista experiences is hard coded in the operating system, and does not impact guest VMs.

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