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this is my first time at ServerFault, I'm a stackoverflow user.

I'm faceing the next problem and may be its me, but I can't find proper guides to set up a domain and nameservers for a dedicated box.

I have a domain, at whois.com, and a Dedicated server at Reliable Hosting Services, the server has 5 IPs, I know that I need 2 of them for the nameservers.

Right now, my domain at whois.com is using nsX.whois.com nameservers and it has 2 child nameservers: ns1.mydomain.com & ns2.mydomain.com pointing to those 2 IPs from my Server.

Whats next? I still cannot set that domain as my main server domain since it says:

To map an IP to a domain, the domain must ping to the same IP, otherwise, the domain will stop working. The domain you are trying to map this IP to, doesn't resolve back to the IP, and so it cannot be set as the default domain for the IP.

Well and I'm stuck on those steps, whats next to have my nameservers working and my main domain assigned to my server?

Thank you very much and happy new year!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't have to run your own DNS nameservers. In fact, I'd highly advise against it due to the long history of security vulnerabilities across the range of DNS software. You simply need a DNS provider that is authoritative for your domain and will respond to DNS queries for records within that domain. Here's a quick example:

  1. Bob registers "foobar.com" with GoDaddy (or Whois or Network Solutions, etc).
  2. Bob decides to host his DNS with OpenDNS (or Dyn or UltraDNS, etc).
  3. Bob creates an account with OpenDNS and creates a zone with the following entries:

    foobar.com. A 1.2.3.4
    www.foobar.com. CNAME foobar.com.

  4. Bob goes back to GoDaddy and changes his authoritative nameservers to point to the public servers for OpenDNS.

As you can see, the DNS service is provided elsewhere. You don't have to worry about patching the software yourself, dealing with network problems, scalability issues, etc. In fact, many DNS providers (including OpenDNS) provide a free service for smaller accounts. Hope this helps!

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Ok, and what should I do with my hosting, I need a DNS Template? Hypothetically, if I get nameservers from DNS service, what should I do with my dedicated server? –  BoDiE2003 Jan 1 '11 at 3:48
    
I thought the dedicated server was for some service that you were trying to provide (e.g. web). If you don't need it for anything else, then cancel the hosting service. As far as the DNS template, you shouldn't need one. The popular DNS providers make it very easy to set up your zone and add records. Check it out first then ask questions later. :) –  obfuscurity Jan 1 '11 at 3:54
    
The dedicated server it is already configured with Kloxo Administration panel. –  BoDiE2003 Jan 1 '11 at 4:03
    
I don't understand what you're getting at. Do you need the dedicated server or not? Besides DNS, what would you use it for? –  obfuscurity Jan 1 '11 at 4:12
    
I have a dedicated server that Ill use for websites hosting. –  BoDiE2003 Jan 1 '11 at 4:14

Here's my attempt at explaining things:

I'm faceing the next problem and may be its me, but I can't find proper guides to set up a domain and nameservers for a dedicated box.

There are three entities in this scenario. The registrar, the DNS host and the hosting server. Whois.com is your registrar. They registered the name for you. Then you need someone to host the DNS records for you. Apparently, Whois.com also does that for you (see under "DNS Management").

I have a domain, at whois.com, and a Dedicated server at Reliable Hosting Services, the server has 5 IPs, I know that I need 2 of them for the nameservers.

Okay, cool. However, you don't need two of those 5 IPs for nameservers. Whois.com already is your DNS host. So when you look in your whois.com DNS control panel, you then choose to forward your domain to the IP(s) that you want. Technically, you could forward your registered domain to Microsoft.com's servers if you want.

Right now, my domain at whois.com is using nsX.whois.com nameservers

Excellent. As it should be.

and it has 2 child nameservers: ns1.mydomain.com & ns2.mydomain.com pointing to those 2 IPs from my Server.

Wait a minute, that's not right. As far as I can tell from your scenario, you're not hosting your own DNS servers. Unless ns1.mydomain.com and ns2.mydomain.com are DNS servers that you've set up running BIND or something. What you want is for nsX.whois.com to be your authoritative name servers. From there, you create records like A, CNAME, TXT, whatever you like from your whois.com control panel. For example, an A record that points to the IP of your Reliable Hosting server.

I still cannot set that domain as my main server domain since it says:

To map an IP to a domain, the domain must ping to the same IP, otherwise, the domain will stop working. The domain you are trying to map this IP to, doesn't resolve back to the IP, and so it cannot be set as the default domain for the IP.

Which system is saying that error? Whois.com's DNS management console or Reliable Hosting? Mapping an IP to a domain is a PTR record. For some reason, that message isn't making sense to me.

Well and I'm stuck on those steps, whats next to have my nameservers working and my main domain assigned to my server?

Regardless of any weirdness that's going on now, you ultimately just want your Whois.com name servers to be authoritative and then create records in Whois.com's DNS management control panel that point whatever A records you have to the IP of your Reliable Hosting server.

All will be well in the land.

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