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I'm running a MySQL 5.0 database server on Windows Server 2008. The total size of the database is about 1Gb.

I make daily backups, but I'd like to step up to having a slave server for extra protection. My thinking was that I wouldn't need the expense of a Windows machine to do this, and a Linux "cloud server" from RackSpace would do the job well for quite a low cost.

However I have little experience with Linux, so I have a few questions...

  1. Does this sound like a good idea? Is there anything wrong with linking Windows and Linux MySQL servers?
  2. Does Linux have the equivalent of Remote Desktop Connection? If so can I use this from a Windows machine?
  3. Would a particular Linux distro be well suited to this task? RackSpace offer ArchLinux, CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu. My immediate thinking is to go with Ubuntu as I've heard it's more friendly for people coming from a Windows background.

Any comments you have would be very appreciated!

Phil

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up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Yes, it is a good idea. Mysql replication is o.s. independent.
  2. If linux machine has a graphical environmente (KDE, GNOME, etc.) you can use VNC or other software like Remote Desktop. But I think RackSpace offers only ssh access to you linux machine. By ssh you can do everythings you need; read this tutorial.
  3. Debian is the lightest disto and it is perfect for you mysql server.

I can suggest to you begin with a local install (read this but install only mysql). You can install debian into any old pc.

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That's a fantastic tutorial - I have this set up already! Thanks for recommending Debian, it's running really well. –  philwilks Jan 6 '11 at 9:40
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