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I have a Mac Mini (1.83GHz, 1.5 RAM) with a fresh install of OS X Snow Leopard Server and I want to use it for DNS and web hosting.

What I have done so far is to go to the domain registrar and configure a new nameserver (ns.domain.tld) to point to my static IP. This Mac Mini is behind a DI-524 router and I have forwarded ports 53 and 80 to the Mini.

I have also added the domain name to the DNS configuration panel:

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but intodns.com gives the following error (among others, and obviously the site is not working): "Mismatched NS records WARNING: One or more of your nameservers did not return any of your NS records."

I don't know where to go from here ..

Thank you to anyone willing to take the time to give me a hint!!

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Make sure you've got forward and reverse zones set up correctly. You will need to create a mapping as well for ns.domain.tld and make sure that resolves properly on the server itself. Make sure your server is set up to use 127.0.0.1 as its DNS, and while you're doing all of this testing, don't use any alternate DNS servers, and don't do any DNS forwarding. That should get you started... –  Harv Jan 13 '11 at 9:52
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2 Answers

Looks like you need to create NS or Nameserver records for your machine in the DNS configuration panel. There should be a way to create new records., probably however you created the test and www records. You'll want to create a new record of type NS, or Nameserver, and you'll want the IP to be your static IP.

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For testing of your DNS setup use dig

$ dig @127.0.0.1 _hostname_

or

$ dig @127.0.0.1 -x _IP_address_

other useful commands are host, hostname and ping

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