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I want my domain name to point to my static IP address. Where should I start?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a host (A) record for your domain name set to your static IP.

mydomain.com IN A 1.2.3.4

EDIT:
In response to your comment, nameservers are declared using NS records:

mydomain.com IN NS dns1.mydomain.com
mydomain.com IN NS dns2.mydomain.com

This tells the world that both dns1.mydomain.com and dns2.mydomain.com host your domain and can provide authoritative answers to queries. Note that dns1 and dns2 must have valid host (A) records in your domain as well. It is highly recommended to have nameservers in different subnets. (just ask Microsoft)

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Thanks. What if I want to set name servers? Like, ns1.mydomain.com. So other domains can point to mydomain? –  webnat0 Jan 23 '11 at 23:18
    
@Daeyun: see my edit –  squillman Jan 23 '11 at 23:21
    
Hmm. I'm still having some problems. This is what I did. I installed ubuntu on Amazon EC2 and installed LAMP with Virtualmin. Then I went to GoDaddy's DNS manager and changed the host (A) record to my elastic IP. –  webnat0 Jan 23 '11 at 23:40
    
@Daeyun: it can take up to 48 hours for dns changes to propogate. Might need to give it some time. –  squillman Jan 24 '11 at 1:18
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There are some free DNS websites with severl useful resources. I used freedns.afraid.org for setting up mine to start with until I set up a server to host it myself.

Dyndns is good, but if your address is static you had to either pay for the service or continue to follow links in emails they sent to keep the dns active. I also found the free service rather limited.

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