Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got an alarm that my swap usage was up to 80%, which turned to be a fact when I checked topas.

The problems I've found were:

1) Looking into a vmstat 5 10, I found lots of PIs with 0 SRs. How's that even possible?

kthr    memory              page              faults              cpu
----- ----------- ------------------------ ------------ -----------------------
r   b   avm    fre    re  pi  po  fr   sr  cy  in   sy    cs    us sy id wa    pc    ec
12  1 12245252 92621   0 229   0   0    0   0 1884 56260  24568 84 15  0  0  2.50  99.9
12  1 12245413 90313   0 190   0   0    0   0 1764 51759  23827 86 14  0  0  2.50  99.9
12  1 12245193 88040   0 218   0   0    0   0 1734 69307  25347 85 15  0  0  2.50  99.9
14  1 12246377 83810   0 157   0   0    0   0 1960 80471  24057 84 16  0  0  2.50 100.0
13  1 12246050 79785   0 183   0   0    0   0 2280 103138 21990 81 19  0  0  2.50 100.0
12  1 12245988 77393   0 173   0   0    0   0 1881 51984  22331 84 16  0  0  2.50 100.0
14  1 12246180 74721   0 179   0   0    0   0 1792 52624  20610 79 21  0  0  2.50  99.9
15  1 12246131 72304   0 176   0   0    0   0 2109 58504  23344 82 18  0  0  2.50  99.9
15  1 12246673 68231   0 187   0   0    0   0 2272 73068  25319 85 15  0  0  2.50  99.9
13  1 12246305 66342   0 172   0   0    0   0 1966 104313 21884 83 17  0  0  2.50 100.0

2) I went off to find who were consuming my precious memory and it I found that I actually know very little in how to figure that in a AIX.

Found this command somewhere which seemed reasonable reading the manual:

 ps -ealf | head -1 ; ps -ealf | sort -rn +9 | head

which seemed reasonable by looking in the manual and gave an output of the sort:

F      S   UID       PID   PPID   C PRI NI ADDR        SZ    STIME     TTY   TIME CMD
242001 A  util   1581080      1  76  60 20 fb34510 150044 10:55:40   pts/0 103:43 /usr...
242001 A  util    569540      1   0  60 20 d235510 142580 11:01:09   pts/0  68:55 /usr/...
242001 A  util   1425464      1   4  60 20 43c6510 129916 23:17:58       - 168:02 /usr...
202001 A  util    245864      1  83  60 24 da9e510 113008 13:37:22   pts/2  43:26 /usr/...
242001 A  util   1163370      1   0  68 24 d69d510 103572 09:55:52  pts/13  17:24 /usr/...
242001 A  util    466984      1   0  60 20 5d0c510 83064  11:00:34   pts/0  22:57 /usr/...
242001 A  raid   1048782      1   7  60 20 e5b8510 78724  16:41:18   pts/6   0:36 /usr/...
242001 A  util    659612      1  13  60 20 edc3510 76400  11:13:17   pts/0  10:57 /usr/...
242001 A  util   1134736      1   0  60 20 eb91510 75188  06:21:23       -  27:23 /usr/...

Where SZ is supposed to be the size in 1k units, according to the man page; which also didn't make too much sense for these are Java processes with Xms=1G (or so) and as shown the biggest process has ~150mb. Again.. ?

And for the last, my server is not currently at maximum load but still shows ~20% of swap space usage. How do I explain that?

I'm pretty lost. These things were easier to figure with Solaris.

Would someone share some thoughts?

share|improve this question

migrated from superuser.com Jan 24 '11 at 3:56

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

    
Can you display the VSZ for each process as well as/instead of the SZ? e.g. ps -o pid,ppid,sz,vsz? –  Mikel Jan 24 '11 at 5:26
    
You also didn't say how much RAM and swap the system had. Try running lsps -s. –  Mikel Jan 24 '11 at 5:28

1 Answer 1

What are your vmm settings settings ?

Make sure you have lru_file_repage=1.

vmo -o lru_file_repage

The default setting (lru_file_repage=0) has the effect that AIX pages out application pages, even if there are plenty of cached files around where pages could be thrown away. One effect is a growing paging space use.

The setting lru_file_repage=0 is the default up and including AIX 5.3

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.