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On Linux it's possible to set /32 netmask on seconday routable IP and use internal (e.g. 192.168.*) network for routing to avoid wasting 3 routable IPs in /30 network.

It alike trick possible on Windows?

UPD: Yes, it's possible (at least on Windows 7), here is part of ipconfig /all

Ethernet adapter lan1:

  IPv4-address. . . . . . . . . . . : 178.x.x.x
  Network mask. . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
  IPv4-address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.12
  Network mask. . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
  Default gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.2.1
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1 Answer 1

If you're using /32 there are no routable IPs in the "subnet", /32 = No Hosts, All Network.

If you use a /30 then you have 2 hosts (usually used on PTP links where the software gets confused by /31; technically the /31 only has the network ID and a broadcast ID, but most modern software recognizes the special case and 'disables' those).

I'm not sure after re-reading the question of what you're trying to do. Perhaps you could explain in more detail; I'm guessing that you're misunderstanding how Linux is handling your configuration (but I could easly be guessing wrong).

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Actually it's possible. See UPD if you're interested. :) –  darkk Jan 31 '11 at 18:57
    
@darkk, do you have any links regarding UPD? I've never heard of it and can't seem to find it on Google. –  Chris S Feb 6 '11 at 15:24

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