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We're implementing a tagging system for our site, where tags are delimited by a comma (",") and using fulltext-search in sql server to search for items tagged with something. The problem is, whe're finding the search results a bit too forgiving and would like searches to only break on commas.

We found an article on msdn (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd207002.aspx) describing how to install custom word breakers, but we're not to keen on paying a third party to deliver a .dll to us - is there any other way?

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2 Answers 2

You mean except implementing the DLL yourself? No. But that is something you can do. Just start programming ;)

Note taht this is 208 R2 (!) only as a solution, so it is not even applciable to your database server (which you say is 2008).

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Here's the SQL 2008 version at that article. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd207002%28v=SQL.100%29.aspx Customer word breakers are fully supported on SQL 2008 as well. There isn't much change in full text search (if any) between SQL 2008 and SQL 2008 R2. –  mrdenny Jan 27 '11 at 17:48

You would probably need to write a custom word breaker dll and attach that to the SQL Server. Also here's the SQL 2008 version of that article (unless you are actually on R2).

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How would this compare to writing a replacement set in the sql server thesaurus replacing all delimiters with nothing? I.E: <replacement> <pat>-</pat> <sub></sub> </replacement> –  nillls Jan 28 '11 at 9:17
    
A custom word breaker would be more efficient over all, as string replacement in SQL Server is not efficient in the slightest. –  mrdenny Jan 28 '11 at 18:16

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