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Well the tcp segment number is used to identify a byte in the byte stream. So does tcp only support a payload of size one byte only ?

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closed as not a real question by Iain, DanBig, Scott Pack, Sven, Wesley Jan 27 '11 at 19:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Jake - You're not reading or ignoring comments left for you - can I ask you to re-read our FAQ and look at the other questions on this site as I'm not convinced there's a perfect fit going on here - you seem to ask a lot of homework-style questions and can't have used any other search systems first before asking. You've also asked 8 homework-style questions in less than 48 hours without accepting any. –  Chopper3 Jan 27 '11 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Seriously, you need to re-read your TCP/IP. Quoting Wikipedia:

Sequence number (32 bits) – has a dual role:

  • If the SYN flag is set, then this is the initial sequence number. The sequence number of the actual first data byte (and the acknowledged number in the corresponding ACK) are then this sequence number plus 1.
  • If the SYN flag is clear, then this is the accumulated sequence number of the first data byte of this packet for the current session.
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No

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Actually, it's only 7 bit. The 8th bit is a checksum... –  Sven Jan 27 '11 at 15:34
    
books talk about tcp sending octets. Then what are these octets ? Arent they the payload ? –  user68350 Jan 27 '11 at 15:39
    
@user68350: tcpipguide.com/free/index.htm –  Iain Jan 27 '11 at 15:39
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You flatter me Jed, I'm actually rubbish at all this stuff. Seriously though what you may not be aware of is 'Jake's history on this site, he's been here for two days and asked 8 homework questions, he's clearly put no effort whatsoever into any of them and I'm one of those guys that thinks a lazy question does not justify a complex, time-consuming answer - it would only encourage more of the same. Totally get what you say, it's not a good answer and perhaps I'm taking his history out on him but I'm not only a human but pretty much the only active mod (until next week anyway :) ) –  Chopper3 Jan 27 '11 at 16:08
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I'd say it's a justified answer given @Chopper3's reasons in the comment above and the comment in the question. This is supposed to be a site for people to get help with their work, not homework. Or if people do want homework help at least show they're putting in effort to understanding the work. It's a little suspicious to have a large number of questions all asked at once if it's something they're working on in class. That's just my feeling, though. –  Bart Silverstrim Jan 27 '11 at 16:19

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