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I have a MySQL database installed on a OpenSuse 11.1 server (it is a Bitnami image).

The database works fine, it can stay many days without any error, but when MySQL receives a huge amount of transactions, it dies immediately. The next screen shows the error:

screenshot of the error

Moreover, I don't know how to restart MySQL. I have tried this:

/opt/bitnami/mysql/bin/mysqld start

But it doesn't work, that gives me the next output:

110209 17:09:01 [ERROR] Fatal error: Please read "Security" section of the manual to find out how to run mysqld as root!

110209 17:09:01 [ERROR] Aborting

110209 17:09:01 [Note] /opt/bitnami/mysql/bin/mysqld.bin: Shutdown complete

It doesn't matter which kind of statements are executing, if they are a huge amount, MySQL dies. The MySQL server version is 5.1.30

What can be causing these sudden failures?

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Are you running out of memory (real plus swap) and the OOM-Killer (out-of-memory killer) is killing your MySQL server processes? –  David Mackintosh Feb 9 '11 at 22:17
3  
What's "creepy" about it? –  Mark Henderson Feb 9 '11 at 22:17
    
To find out if the OOM-Killer is killing it, check /var/log/syslog or /var/log/kern.log for messages about being out of memory and invoking oom-killer. –  DerfK Feb 9 '11 at 23:43
    
If you'd copied and pasted the actual text instead of taking a screen shot it might have been a lot easier to read. –  John Gardeniers Feb 9 '11 at 23:45
    
@DerfK I don't have any of those log files :| –  kiewic Feb 10 '11 at 13:21

2 Answers 2

It means what it says: MySQL won't run as the root user for security reasons. The init script for MySQL contains some magic to make it run as an unprivileged user. The documentation I found says this is what you want to run:

/opt/bitnami/ctlscript.sh restart mysql
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Hypothesis: OOMKiller is killing your mysql daemon because you're near to out of memory.

Fact: You can't start mysqld directly as root; see [mysqlroot]/bin/mysqld_safe for a daemon wrapper you can start as root.

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