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on my NFS mounts, there are thousands of .nfs* files. What are they ?

Are they the files left behind by stale NFS handle ?

Thanks

445074   20 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000        19864 Feb 10 11:16 ./.nfs000000000006ca9200000004
445075    4 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000         1253 Feb  8 12:38 ./.nfs000000000006ca9300000005
188056    4 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000         1254 Feb 14 13:44 ./.nfs000000000002de9800000007
645729 6556 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000      6693189 Feb 14 16:52 ./.nfs000000000009da6100000008
188058    4 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000         1254 Feb 14 13:45 ./.nfs000000000002de9a00000009
188055   68 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000        64114 Feb 14 16:42 ./.nfs000000000002de970000000a
645730    4 -rw-rw-rw-   1 19654    5000         2872 Feb 14 16:12 ./.nfs000000000009da620000000b
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

They're usually renamed and locked files that were deleted/tried-to-delete when they were open.

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1  
Unix only reclaims space when the link-count of a file is zero. When a file is opened, unix internally increments the link count. So, if you delete a file while it is open, the file must still exist until that file is closed. This is the NFS server's way of keeping the file around until that client's process closes the file and the server can reclaim the blocks / inodes from that file. –  chris Feb 16 '11 at 13:39
    
And I believe the NFS server is suppose to figure out when the client closes the file; if the client crashes prior to closing the file, possibly the NFS server won't ever find out that the file is closed, so these files will linger. Go talk to user 19654 (and try to get your UID / username mapping to work consistently across your enterprise) and find out what's up. –  chris Feb 16 '11 at 15:16

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