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We are using 389 Directory Server on a Fedora machine as our LDAP server and wish to sign on to Mac OS X Snow Leopard clients using this. Is there a particular LDAP schema to use for Mac OS X Snow Leopard? (The default schema of 389 Directory Server does not seem to work.)

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2 Answers 2

You don't need any special schema for basic functionality. You can use Directory Utility on the Mac to map LDAP attributes to user, group, and automount attributes.

In older versions, there was a feature to save the mapping on the server, but it does nothing in Snow Leopard. Now, you must extract everything within the "LDAP Server Configs" part of /Library/Preferences/DirectoryService/DSLDAPv3PlugInConfig.plist and save it in the description attribute in cn=macosxodconfig,dc=yourbasedn.

Here is the outside of mine to give you a hint:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
<dict>
    <key>Attribute Type Map</key>
    <array>
    ...
</dict>

You can still use Workgroup Manager if you add the apple.schema to 389 and remap some attributes. I found a tutorial for OpenLDAP. The only difference for 389 will be how you import the schema. Also, the author was using OS X 10.5 with a working "Write to Server" button in the Directory Utility attribute map.

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Refer section 3.4 in http://www.csse.uwa.edu.au/~ashley/fedora-ds/fedora-ds-26072006.html

This page is a graphically illustrated (screenshots) step-by-step guide to setting up your Fedora DS servers to use SSL. This guide also includes client configuration for many linux and unix systems, and even Mac.

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