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So i use real server hardware at home, but since I am not rich, I can largely just afford one and hope to upgrade the disks and memory on just this single unit. Now comes a challenge that I do not have enough experience to figure how to properly implement:

At present, i have a virtualised AD domain in this server. While the server physically comes with two network ports, both are connected to the same switch; I only have one network in my entire home. And naturally only one broadband router out to the Internet. One network port is dedicated to the host machine/parent partition, while the other is for Hyper-V guests. All nodes physical or virtual use 192.168.1.0/24.

Now, I have interest to simulate a multi-site domain. If I am to set up another domain controller, I'd like to place it in a subnet 192.168.2.0/24. And this is where I am unsure how to proceed.

I could just assign the second domain controller network adapter to 192.168.2.0/24 but how can I properly route this, as the default gateway of machines in 192.168.1.0/24 is 192.168.1.1 - the broadband router. So requests for 192.168.2.0/24 are just going to shoot out into the Internet with no return. My Linksys router only works as a single subnet. Secondly, machines in the 192.168.2.0/24 subnet ought to have Internet access just like the original 192.168.1.0/24 nodes.

It seems I may need an "authoritative" router device that controls both (or more) internal networks, before routing Internet-bound packets to the actual broadband router?

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1 Answer 1

I implement something like this by assigning machines on one virtual subnet & domain to a Hyper-V Internal Only virtual network. Then I use the Server 2008 routing to route between the internal networks and the physical NICs.

I use this for NAT and for rerouting ports on the physical machine to RDP on the VMs - but it sounds like you can just route straight through. It sounds like you can just route through since the IPs will be valid on your external network.

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so I have to install the RRAS role on the parent Win 2008 partition and make it the router. –  icelava Jul 15 '09 at 8:46
    
To use this method, yes. –  dmo Jul 21 '09 at 19:26

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